How to Install Java 17 on Linux Operating Systems

​Hey there! Today, we’ll be discussing how to install Java 17 on Linux operating systems. This is a pretty simple process, but we’ll go over it step-by-step to make sure everything is installed correctly.

First, you’ll need to download the Java 17 installation files from the Oracle website. You can find these files under the “Java SE Downloads” section. Once you’ve downloaded the files, you’ll need to unzip them to a location on your computer.

Next, open up a terminal window and navigate to the folder where you unzipped the Java 17 files. Once you’re in the correct folder, you’ll need to run the following command:

sudo apt-get install oracle-java17-installer

This will install the Oracle Java 17 installer onto your computer. Once the installation is complete, you’ll be able to use Java 17 on your Linux operating system.

Prerequisites for Installing Java 17

​Java is a versatile and powerful programming language that enables developers to create robust, high-performance applications. Java is the foundation for practically every type of networked application and is the global standard for developing and delivering mobile applications, games, Web-based content, and enterprise software.

With so many devices and platforms relying on Java, it’s important that you keep your Java development environment up to date. Java SE 17 is the latest release of the Java Platform Standard Edition. In this blog, we’ll show you the steps to take in order to install Java SE 17 on Linux.

Before we get started, there are a few prerequisites that need to be met:

• You will need to have a Linux distribution installed. We’ll be using Ubuntu 18.04 for this guide, but any major Linux distribution will work.

• You will need to have administrative privileges in order to install Java.

• Make sure that you have enough disk space available. The minimum amount of disk space required for Java SE 17 is 175 MB.

• You will need to have a text editor available. We’ll be using gedit for this guide, but any text editor will work.

Once you have met the prerequisites listed above, you’re ready to install Java SE 17 on your Linux machine.

The first thing you’ll need to do is update the package index. This will ensure that you have the latest version of all existing software packages. To do this, open a terminal and enter the following command:

$ sudo apt-get update

Next, we’ll need to install the Oracle JDK. Oracle JDK is the official version of the Java Development Kit maintained by Oracle. To install it, enter the following command in your terminal:

$ sudo apt-get install oracle-java17-installer

If you’re prompted to accept the Oracle Binary Code License Agreement, do so by pressing Enter. Once the installation is complete, you can verify that Java was properly installed by checking the version of the Java compiler:

$ javac -version

If everything was installed correctly, you should see the following output:

ALSO READ  Explaining How Linux Works: An Overview for Everyone

javac 17

Now that you have Java SE 17 installed on your Linux machine, you’re ready to start developing Java applications.

How to Install Java 17 on Linux Operating Systems 3

Steps for Installing Java 17

​Java is a versatile and powerful programming language that enables developers to create robust, high-performance applications. As one of the most popular programming languages, Java is used by millions of developers and billions of devices worldwide.

Although Java is platform-independent, meaning it can run on any operating system, there are some steps that need to be followed in order to install Java 17 on a Linux machine.

The first step is to check if the machine already has Java installed. This can be done by entering the following command in the terminal: java -version. If Java is not installed, the output will be “command not found”.

If Java is not installed, the next step is to download the Java 17 SDK from the Oracle website. Once the SDK has been downloaded, unzip it to the directory of your choice.

The next step is to set up the environment variable JAVA_HOME. This can be done by editing the .bashrc file and adding the following line: export JAVA_HOME=/path/to/java/sdk.

After setting up the environment variable, the next step is to add the Java SDK’s bin directory to the PATH variable. This can be done by adding the following line to the .bashrc file: export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin.

Once the PATH variable has been updated, the next step is to verify the installation by running the java -version command again. This time, the output should be the version of Java that was just installed.

Congratulations! You have now successfully installed Java 17 on your Linux machine.

How to Install Java 17 on Linux Operating Systems 2

Setting Up Java Environment Variables

​If you’ve been using Java for any amount of time, you know that it’s important to have the right environment variables set up. Depending on your system and how you’ve installed Java, there are a few different ways to do this. In this blog post, we’ll walk you through the process of setting up your environment variables for Java on a Linux system.

The first thing you’ll need to do is find out where your Java installation is located. If you’re using the default installation, it will be in one of the following locations:

/usr/lib/jvm/java-17-oracle
/usr/lib/jvm/java-17-openjdk

Once you’ve located your installation, you’ll need to set the JAVA_HOME environment variable to point to it. You can do this by adding the following line to your .bashrc or .bash_profile file:

export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-17-oracle

If you’re using a different shell, consult the documentation for your shell on how to set environment variables.

After you’ve set the JAVA_HOME variable, you’ll also need to add the bin directory of your Java installation to your PATH. This will allow you to run the java and javac commands from any directory. To do this, simply add the following line to your .bashrc or .bash_profile file:

export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin

Again, if you’re using a different shell, consult the documentation for your shell on how to set environment variables.

That’s it! You should now have your environment variables set up correctly for Java on Linux.

Troubleshooting Tips for Installing Java 17

​Java 17 is a big release and there are bound to be some issues when installing it. Here are some troubleshooting tips to help you through the installation process.

ALSO READ  How to Edit smb.conf File in Linux Mint System

Firstly, make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your system. You can check this by going to the Java website and clicking on the “Download” button.

If you’re using Windows, you should also check that you have the latest version of the Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable installed. This is required for Java 17 to run properly on Windows. You can download the latest version from the Microsoft website.

Once you’ve checked that you have the required software installed, you can now proceed with installing Java 17.

If you’re using Linux, the process is slightly different. You’ll need to first add the PPA for Java 17 to your sources. You can do this by running the following command:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:openjdk-r/ppa

Once the PPA has been added, you can update your package list and install Java 17 by running the following commands:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install openjdk-17-jdk

If you’re using Windows, you can download the Java 17 installer from the Oracle website. Once the download has finished, run the installer and follow the on-screen prompts.

Once Java 17 is installed, you can check that it is working properly by running the “java -version” command. This should print out the version of Java that is installed on your system.

If you encounter any problems during the installation process, or Java 17 isn’t working properly after it has been installed, feel free to leave a comment below and we’ll try our best to help you out.

How to Install Java 17 on Linux Operating Systems

Uninstalling Java 17 from Linux

​If you’re here, it’s probably because you want to know how to uninstall Java 17 from Linux. And we’re here to help!

We’ll go over a few different methods for uninstalling Java 17 from Linux, so you can choose the one that’s best for you.

Method 1: Uninstalling Java 17 using the command line

If you’re comfortable using the command line, uninstalling Java 17 is actually pretty simple. Just open up a terminal and run the following command:

sudo apt-get remove openjdk-17-*

This will remove all of the OpenJDK 17 packages from your system. If you only want to remove a specific package, you can use the name of that package instead of the asterisk.

Method 2: Uninstalling Java 17 using a GUI tool

If you’re not comfortable using the command line, don’t worry! There are graphical tools that can help you uninstall Java 17 from your system.

One tool you can use is the Ubuntu Software Center. Just search for “openjdk” in the Software Center, and you should see a list of all the OpenJDK packages installed on your system. Once you find the package you want to remove, just click the “Remove” button.

Another tool you can use is the Synaptic Package Manager. Just search for “openjdk” in Synaptic, and then select the packages you want to remove and click the “Mark for Removal” button. Once you’ve selected all the packages you want to remove, click the “Apply” button to uninstall them.

Method 3: Manual removal

If you want to completely remove Java 17 from your system, you can do so by manually removing the files it installed. This is a bit more complicated than the other methods, so we don’t recommend it unless you’re comfortable working with files and directories in Linux.

ALSO READ  How to Increase JMeter Heap Size on Linux Systems

Here’s a list of files and directories you’ll need to remove:

/usr/lib/jvm/java-17-openjdk
/usr/lib/jvm/java-17-openjdk-amd64
/etc/java-17-openjdk
/etc/profile.d/java-17-openjdk.sh
/etc/profile.d/java-17-openjdk.csh

Once you’ve removed all of those files and directories, Java 17 should be completely removed from your system.

How to Install Java 17 on Linux Operating Systems 4

Benefits of Java 17

​Java 17 is the most recent release of the Java programming language. It was released on September 21, 2017.

Java 17 is a major release that includes many new features and enhancements. The most notable changes in Java 17 include:

-A new garbage collector, ZGC, that is designed for low-latency applications
-A low-overhead memory-pressure-based resizing of ZGC’s allocated heap
-Improvements to the G1 garbage collector
-A new experimental file-based JDBC driver
– enhancements to the Javadoc tool

Java 17 also includes several other changes and enhancements, which are listed in the release notes.

The benefits of upgrading to Java 17 include:

-A new garbage collector that can reduce latency and improve performance for applications that require low-latency response times.
-Improvements to the existing G1 garbage collector.
-A new JDBC driver that can improve performance for applications that access databases via JDBC.
-Enhancements to Javadoc, which can make it easier to generate API documentation.

Conclusion:

​As we come to the end of our journey on how to install Java 17 on Linux, we wanted to take a moment to share some final thoughts.

Overall, we found the process to be relatively straightforward. However, there were a few steps that required a bit more attention, such as setting up the environment variables and adding the Java repository.

We hope that this guide has been helpful in getting Java 17 up and running on your Linux system. As always, if you have any questions or feedback, feel free to reach out to us in the comments below.

Now that you have Java 17 up and running, we encourage you to explore all that it has to offer. This release includes a number of new features and enhancements that are sure to improve your Java development experience.

We hope you enjoy using Java 17 on Linux!

FAQs

What is Java 17?

Java 17, also known as Java 17 LTS (Long-Term Support), is a version of the Java programming language and runtime environment. It’s a stable release that comes with long-term support and updates, making it a suitable choice for production environments.

Can I have multiple versions of Java installed on my Linux system?

Yes, you can have multiple Java versions installed on your system. You can use the update-alternatives command (on Debian-based systems) or adjust environment variables to switch between different Java versions as needed.

Is there an easy way to manage Java versions on Linux?

Yes, tools like sdkman or jenv can help you manage multiple Java versions on your Linux system easily. These tools provide a convenient way to install, switch, and manage different Java versions. You can choose the one that suits your needs and follow their documentation for installation and usage.

Bryan is a passionate coder and the driving force behind Codeswimming.com, a coding learning blog that dives deep into the world of programming and web development. With a wealth of experience and a thirst for knowledge, Bryan has dedicated his career to making complex coding concepts accessible to learners of all levels.

Leave a Comment